Social Strife of South Africa in 2021 Fueled by Economic Issue than Political Instability

Authors

  • Subhendu Bhattacharya Assistant Professor, Department of Management, Amity Global Business School, Mumbai, India
  • Tanisha Rach Business Administration Student, Amity Global Business School, Mumbai, India

Keywords:

Economic downturn, Unemployment, Income inequality, Pandemic trouble, Public wretchedness, Social unrest, Riot and Vandalism

Abstract

Massive violence erupted in July 2021 across various places in South Africa. The widespread protest and looting were triggered by arrest and imprisonment of former president Jacob Zuma who received 15 months jail term for corruption charges during his tenure. Supporters of Zuma went on a rampage and caused serious damage to private and govt. properties. Several people died and injured due to clashes between rioters and military forces. This social turmoil is outcome of economic collapse in South Africa. Economy faced a massive setback due to pandemic crisis and incompetent handling of economic affair. Supply chain for businesses was severely disrupted and people faced acute food and fuel shortage. Inflation went spiralling high amidst social tension. In recent time, economic performance deteriorated and contraction in every sector led to high level of unemployment and poverty. Desperate people indulged in looting and vandalism which clarified level of frustration in social life. There was massive deployment of troops to quell the unrest. President Ramaphosa addressed the nation to maintain calm but real challenge remained unaddressed. Youth unemployment, wage rate stagnation, income inequality, unaffordable education, soaring inflation, govt. inability to disburse fund to support poor people worst hit by pandemic and economic deceleration stoked the fire of social unrest.

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Published

06-08-2021

How to Cite

[1]
S. Bhattacharya and T. Rach, “Social Strife of South Africa in 2021 Fueled by Economic Issue than Political Instability”, IJRESM, vol. 4, no. 8, pp. 38–40, Aug. 2021.

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