Technology Played Decisive Role in Armenia-Azerbaijan Conflict of 2020

Authors

  • Subhendu Bhattacharya Assistant Professor, Department of Management, Amity Global Business School, Mumbai, India
  • Diana Fernando Management Student, Amity Global Business School, Mumbai, India

Keywords:

Age-old rivalry, Cultural disharmony, Death and despondence, Disputed territory, Drone attack, Evacuation, Fierce battle, High-tech weapon

Abstract

Armenia and Azerbaijan are two republics in the mountainous Caucasus region situated between Asia and Europe and both were part of erstwhile Soviet republic. Azerbaijan and Armenia were declared sovereignty in September 1989 and August 1990 respectively and both gained independence from Soviet in 1991. Nagorno-Karabakh is locally known as Artsakh with a small territory of 1,700 square miles (4,400 square km) located in southwestern Azerbaijan and populated by ethnic Armenians with the backing of Armenian govt. The place had been bone of contention between two warring nations since 1988. Both the nations were steadfast in their claims over disputed territory. Since 1994, Nagorno-Karabakh was occupied and ruled by ethnic Armenians but the region was officially under Azerbaijan as per international law. Armenia is Christian dominated nation but Azerbaijan has been populated by Muslim community. Azerbaijan received support of neighbor Turkey and launched drone attack at military outfit of opponent. Armenia, with traditional tanker and ground battle troops were no match for sophisticated high-tech weapons of adversary. Russia remained neutral in this gruesome conflict. Battle ended in favour of Azerbaijan and Armenia surrendered with its wounds to nurse. There seemed no sign of lasting peace between two nations and strained relationship would linger in foreseeable future.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Downloads

Published

08-09-2021

How to Cite

[1]
S. Bhattacharya and D. Fernando, “Technology Played Decisive Role in Armenia-Azerbaijan Conflict of 2020”, IJRESM, vol. 4, no. 9, pp. 40–42, Sep. 2021.

Issue

Section

Articles

Most read articles by the same author(s)